25
Jan
09

Etiquette of Thanks

Typically, I only hand out Christmas cards to friends; however, this year, I decided to go the extra mile and start mailing Christmas cards to everyone near and far. It was a nice feeling to send them out and let friends know that I am thinking of them during the season. Of course, I sent them without any expectations of a card in return. I did this because I wanted to. Some of the cards I mailed to bestfriends and close friends, some to close school friends. Definitely, they were sent to people who I have always been in contact with – ranging from IM’s to txt msges to facebook to emails. Contact is there and established. Or so I thought. Fast forward to today, I am now one irritated person. It is the end of January and two cards remain unaccounted for. By unaccounted, I mean recepients did not even bother to inform me they received my cards. Granted I am not expecting nor do I want a big parade or a huge expression of gratitude, all I want is for them to acknowledge that the card was received. A simple thanks would even suffice. I do not even care if it is sent via MSN or if it’s a brief thank you text. Acknowledge that the card was read and that you at least appreciate the thought and well wishes that was sent with the card. Is this too much to ask? I do not think so. Personally, I do not think I am expecting a lot either. If I received a card from someone, I would definitely make sure that I let them know that the piece of paper they sent  is appreciated and that I was glad they thought of me. I guess do unto others does not quite work in this scenario. I mentioned this at another blog and a fellow commenter informed me that etiquette-wise one is not obligated to reply to Christmas cards only to Christmas presents. I do not agree with this statement. In my opinion, a reply is warranted for both – maybe not to the same extent ie. a simple thanks for a card and maybe a thank you note for a present. Refusing to give a simple gesture of thanks is just plain rude!

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